Plymouth Manufacturers Group - Apprentice Recruitment Fair 2016
PMG PMG

Event

Apprenticeship Jobs Fair

Helping you get on the ladder of opportunity to a brighter future.

Plymouth Guildhall Saturday 4th March 2017

The Plymouth Manufacturers Group (the ‘PMG’) is working together with “Building Plymouth” to hold an Apprenticeship Jobs Fair at Plymouth Guildhall in the City Centre on Saturday 4th March 2017 – from 10:00am until 3:00pm.



The event is open to prospective apprentices who are looking to commence employment and training either this year or next, plus (for younger applicants) their parents, guardians and other family members.

It’s a fantastic opportunity to meet all the top employers who are offering hundreds of local apprenticeships in Manufacturing & Engineering, Construction & the Built Environment.

Young people will be able to try their hand at taster activities, demonstrations, sample products, competitions and also meet Plymouth apprentices already working within these dynamic industries.

Now is the time to consider your future career in manufacturing and engineering – here’s why:

  • Interesting and challenging jobs
  • Jobs in a sector with good prospects for the future
  • Jobs which provide opportunities for career progression and further learning
  • Jobs that’ll have you wanting to get out of bed in the morning
  • Rewarding jobs – you’ll get paid from day one, so you’ll earn while you learn
  • Don’t miss out because one things for sure, each of these jobs will get snapped up by someone – why not YOU?

Some facts about manufacturing and apprenticeships in Plymouth – all good reasons why this could be the right career choice for you:

  • Almost 12% of everyone employed in Plymouth works in manufacturing. That’s one in every eight people - more than any other large City in the whole of southern England.
  • Several of Plymouth’s manufacturers are national award winners. Some for their success in exporting products overseas, others for innovation or for their environmental products and some for just being really good businesses – whether they are large or small.
  • Plymouth’s manufacturers have a global reach. Half of them export more than half of their output overseas. Some as much as 90% or more. Two-thirds of Plymouth’s largest manufacturers are overseas owned – either from North America; the Far East or Europe.
  • Some of these firms are amongst the largest and most successful in the world. For instance, between them, just UTC (United Technologies Corporation) and Schneider Electric alone – who both have sites in Southway - employ over 360,000 people globally. That is more than one and half times Plymouth’s total population.
  • Manufacturing apprenticeships provide great career opportunities. Several of our local firms are led today by people who started out as apprentices – including both the PMG’s current Chairman and its previous one!
  • Apprenticeships can lead to further study and qualifications. Some achieve graduate level qualifications if that is what they choose to pursue – a few go even further and complete doctorates.
  • Qualified apprentices take fulfilling roles in a variety of different positions which, in turn, opens up a range of career options that are too numerous to mention here.
  • The PMG are really keen to tackle the gender imbalance and stereotyping that can exist in engineering. We’re supporters of ‘Women in STEM Plymouth’ which is a new group that celebrates the fairer sex’s engagement in our sector.
  • Plymouth manufacturers are diverse and often ‘niche’ – we make everything from cutting-edge LED lighting to luxury motor yachts and from high-precision ball bearings to world leading hydraulic equipment.
  • Manufacturing is vital to Plymouth – it accounts for nearly 16% of our local economy. That’s a far greater proportion than the corresponding national figure which is around 10%.
  • We are home to famous brands including several from the food and confections manufacturing sector: The Wrigley Company; Ginsters and Burts Chips.
  • Some of our manufacturers have to be very precise in their measurements. When making their LED components, Plessey add layers of material that can be as little as 1.5 to 2.5 nanometres thick. Bearing in mind that a sheet of paper is about 100,000 nanometres thick that’s not a lot!
  • Oh and by the way, when you think ‘manufacturing’ don’t think ‘dirty’. Quite the opposite, several of our firms, including, for example, Algram (a subsidiary of the Japanese company Olympus) have cleanrooms - purpose designed facilities, with a dust free, temperature controlled environment where the air inside is constantly recirculated through high-efficiency filters to remove internally generated contaminants.

Think you know enough about manufacturing? Well we can tell you a whole lot more if you join us on 4th March 2017 at Plymouth Guildhall.

Manufacturing Exhibitors

Introductory Guides


General introduction to Apprenticeships

VISIT


A guide to Apprenticeships

DOWNLOAD


A parent’s guide to Apprenticeships

DOWNLOAD

    Manufacturing in Plymouth UK

  • Get to know your facts about the manufacturing industry in Plymouth.

More Detailed Information

If you are after more detailed information about the requirements of an apprenticeship programme, this document entitled: Improving Operational Performance (England) is an apprenticeship framework that is commonly used within the manufacturing sector.

It is a detailed and somewhat technical document for use mainly by employers and colleges to ensure clarity and consistency in what the apprentice is expected to both learn and experience in order to qualify. Nevertheless, it usefully explains the three pathways to achieving the framework, namely: Performing Engineering Operations Level 2, Performing Manufacturing Operations Level 2 and Business Improvement Techniques Level 2.

It also gives an introductory background to the sector (p10-11) and sets out its aims and objectives (p12). It stipulates the required entry conditions (p13) and explains the possible selection process. On pages 17, 31 and 43 it provides examples of the types of job roles that each of the three pathways might lead to.